Anna Dunwell | Writer Yogini

Let Joy Fill You

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Start Date:

2017-08-21T09:31:57EDT


Event Description:

25th Annual Stone Memorial Lecture

Start Date:

2017-09-20T19:00:00EDT


End Time:

2017-09-20T21:00:00EDT


Event Description:

FREE: Register on Link Below "see the event"

Edwidge Danticat, Award-winning author and activist will deliver the 25th Annual Sonja Haynes Stone Memorial Lecture.

Edwidge Danticat is the author of numerous books, including Claire of the Sea Light, a New York Times notable book; Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist; Breath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak!, a National Book Award finalist; The Farming of Bones, an American Book Award winner; and The Dew Breaker, a PEN/Faulkner Award finalist and winner of the inaugural Story Prize. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, she has been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and elsewhere. She lives in Miami.
This event is co-sponsored by the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, Institute for the Study of the Americas, Department of Communications, Center for the Study of the American South, Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies, Carolina Black Caucus, Carolina Women’s Center, Ngozi Design Collective of Durham, NC and Parr Center for Ethics.
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Anna Reading from Paradise Lies: A Modern Slave Narrative Durham NC

Start Date:

2017-10-01T14:00:00EDT


End Time:

2017-10-01T16:30:00EDT


Location:

Hayti Heritage Center


Event Description:

I'll be reading from my book along with others at
the Readers Theatre Ensemble, Hayti Heritage Center, 804 Old Fayetteville Street, Durham, NC 27701

2017 Thomas Wolfe Lecture

Start Date:

2017-10-03T19:30:00EDT


End Time:

2017-10-03T21:00:00EDT


Location:

Genome Sciences Building Auditorium


Event Description:

“Food,” Kevin Young once wrote, is “an everyday and extraordinary festivity—which is where, alongside poetry, it belongs.” Both of them are “necessities we too often take for granted,” offering their partakers “multifaceted pleasures.”
One of the most prolific writers of his generation, Young demonstrates again and again what he calls “the power of pleasure.” He has published ten books of wide-ranging poetry, including the capacious Blue Laws: Selected & Uncollected Poems 1995-2015; Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebels (2011), winner of an American Book Award; and Jelly Roll: a blues (2003), a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the Paterson Poetry Prize. His quick lines and hot verbal licks and bold imaginative leaps are on full display in Dear Darkness (2008), in poems like “Ode to the South” or “Flash Flood Blues” or “Prayer for Black-Eyed Peas”: its two dozen food odes are a high point in regional culinary literature. Young’s first impulse is to praise: even his elegies and laments brim with sonic playfulness, with dynamic voices, with an appetite for what he calls “a living language, even among the heartbreak.” They are serious fun, to read on the page or to hear aloud.
Kevin Young is also the author of The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness (2012), whose essays and cultural criticism and lyrical choruses explore the tradition of African-American “storying,” especially in its songs and singers. He has edited eight volumes, including The Hungry Ear: Poems of Food & Drink (2012); The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton 1965–2010 (2012), winner of the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; The Best American Poetry 2011; The Art of Losing: Poems of Grief & Healing (2010); and two musical anthologies in the Everyman’s Library Pocket Poets series, Jazz Poems (2006) and Blues Poems (2003).
Earlier this year, Young became the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, part of the New York Public Library and an archive repository for information on people of African descent worldwide. From 2005 to 2016, he served as Curator of the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library, a substantial collection of rare and modern poetry housed at Emory University, where he was also the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Creative Writing and English. He is a multifaceted man of letters.
November 2017 is a momentous month for Kevin Young. He will publish his second book of non-fiction, Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News, which is sure to attract plenty of media attention. And he will become Poetry Editor of The New Yorker, the best possible position for anyone to remind the literary public that poetry is, as he once said, “the daily thing. The dirt. It is an everyday, not an occasionally.”


Tuesday, October 3

7:30 p.m.
Genome Sciences Building Auditorium
250 Bell Tower Road
UNC Campus
 
Free and open to the public
Doors will open at 7:00 p.m.
Free parking available in Bell Tower Lot after 5:00 p.m.

Campus Parking Info and Map

Reading from The Portable 19th-Century African American Women Writers

Start Date:

2017-09-27T19:30:00EDT


End Time:

2017-09-28T20:30:00EDT


Location:

The Regulator Book Store


Event Description:

Listen and see Reading Video

"Hollis Robbins: The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American Women Writers

The voices of Women have been scare in the world of literature for most of history, and in the case of black women authors, almost invisible. The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American women Writers provides a needed historical record as well as fascinating insight into what it meant to be a woman of color in the nineteenth century. Several of the nearly fifty writers represented are former slaves, like Louisa Picquet, whose words bluntly describe her hellish treatment, while abolitionist Sarah Parker Ramond, whose mother was Revolutionary War American and father was a "free person of color" born in Curacao (hence not African American), inveighs against slavery in the tones of a worldly Northerner. Other voices speak to the growing recognition of Southern culture, such as an account of life in the Fisk Jubilee Singers and an 1881 culinary guide called "What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking. While these writings conjure pieces of the distant past through their details and unique perspectives, many describe the kind of systemic injustices that, troublingly, persist to this day. Coeditor Hollis Robbins brings the news to Durham on Wednesday. - David Klein " From INDYweek.com 9.27.17